ART HISTORY MEME || [1/6] themes or series or subjects: Greek mythology

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ritasv:

'The Artist and His Muse' by Fred Appleyard

ritasv:

'The Artist and His Muse' by Fred Appleyard

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greuze:

Louise Élisabeth Vigée Le Brun, Madame Grande (Detail), 1783

greuze:

Louise Élisabeth Vigée Le Brun, Madame Grande (Detail), 1783

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msmajorsam:

Lips red as the rose. Hair black as ebony. Skin white as snow.

Snow White cosplay by Major Sam Cosplay
www.facebook.com/MajorSamCosplay

Photography: Lorenzo So Photography
https://www.facebook.com/lorenzosophotography?fref=ts

 

(via fairytalemood)


doxiequeen1:

I finished it yay! I tried it on and realized I couldn’t zip myself into on my own, so the shoulders fit funny since it wasn’t closed all the way in the back. Also the petticoat is way too small. I kind of thought I could get away with it but I can’t, so tonight I’ll make a quilted petticoat.

I also made a day cap out of left over materials. It’s based off of a design from the 1850’s when the dress is from the late 30’s, but that can be our secret.

Made from five yards of printed linen, the bodice is fully lined with muslin, and it zips up the back for convenience. The garment was sewn and drafted by me.

Total time: 28 hours, four days from start to finish. Total Cost: $36

Most of the time was spend hand sewing, and gathering. Dress fabric was $35, trims on the cap and muslin were a gift, and the zipper was $1.


Favourites fan arts: Burial at sea, Bioshock Infinite.

Credits (1,2,3,4).

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Unusual 19th C. cameo.

Unusual 19th C. cameo.

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doxiequeen1:

Progress! Both sleeves are finished, and the bodice is now lined. I just have to sew it all together and add a zipper. 

I still need to make a quilted petticoat to go underneath it, that should lift the hem and make the whole thing look nicer.


kurentsee:

Imogen Heap helps invent gloves that will “change the way we make music”

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stevethompson-art:

Princess and the Frog (C)DISNEY

I always feel this film got a little overlooked. And, as one of the first things i posted about on my blog a few years ago, it too was a little overlooked. A look back at some of the product I designed for the film release of Princess and the Frog. Bookends, a jewelry box and snow globe set, shown here with my original concept sketches and as final product .

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tiffanisis:

My birthday present for @timesorceress 👑 A handmade Druid faerie queen crown. (Aka “her boss bitch crown” haha) more pics of her wearing it to come 😁 #flowercrown #faeriequeen #druid #elven #crown #flowers #spring #pastel #pagan #renaissancefaire #morelikeitwillbeonmyetsy !

tiffanisis:

My birthday present for @timesorceress 👑 A handmade Druid faerie queen crown. (Aka “her boss bitch crown” haha) more pics of her wearing it to come 😁 #flowercrown #faeriequeen #druid #elven #crown #flowers #spring #pastel #pagan #renaissancefaire #morelikeitwillbeonmyetsy !

(via poppies-for-ophelia)


letslovekimono:

Disney Beauty and the Beast Kimono

letslovekimono:

Disney Beauty and the Beast Kimono

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femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)

One wouldn’t expect, looking at his 1919 painting Gassed, that John Singer Sargent could be described thus by the Art Institute of Chicago: “As one of the most sought-after and prolific portraitists of international high society, American expatriate John Singer Sargent painted the cosmopolitan world to which he belonged with elegance and a bravura touch.”

The dramatic composition and range of (highly expressive) emotion are very much his own, however.

In depicting the suffering victims of a World War I mustard gas attack, Sargent pulls no punches—the Imperial War Museum in London points out the “line of temporarily blinded soldiers in the background, one soldier leaning over vomiting onto the ground.”

Perhaps the most striking part of the painting isn’t the anguish. It’s the lack of anguish.

A number of the soldiers at the front of the composition lounge with an air more of boredom than despair, while in the distant background people play soccer in cheerful uniforms.

It’s that sense of normality—the complacency of the subjects—that makes the piece so incredibly gut-wrenching.